Lula Mae “Lou” Spearman Major

Born: Fri., Dec. 25, 1925
Died: Sun., Nov. 15, 2020


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Lula Mae "Lou" Spearman Major

WEST COLUMBIA – Lula Mae "Lou" Spearman Major, 94, of West Columbia passed away on Sunday, November 15, 2020.  

Born on December 25, 1925 in Piedmont, SC, Lou was the daughter of the late James Earl Spearman and the late Lula Ivadell Sanders Spearman.   Lou was predeceased by her husband, Rev. William Monroe Major; her daughter, Nancy Major Seals; her brothers, James Dean Spearman and Paul Curtis Spearman; and sisters Joyce Elizabeth McCullough, Earleen Spearman and Jewel Colleen Sullivan.

She is survived by two daughters, Ruth Major Mason (Don) of Irmo, SC; Mary Lou Major Carroll of Freeport, FL; two sons, William Earl Major and Lee Spearman Major, both of West Columbia, SC; six grandchildren, twelve great-grandchildren and one great-great-grandchild.

Lou graduated with honors from USC School of Nursing.  She retired from the South Carolina Department of Mental Health after serving fifteen years at Crafts-Farrow as a psychiatric nurse.

Lou was a faithful member of Cayce United Methodist Church, where she often taught Sunday School, as her health allowed.  She also volunteered at God's Helping Hands Ministry.

Lou and her husband endeavored to make the world a better place.  Where faith was concerned rather than merely "talk the talk", they both "walked the walk."  They taught us many lessonsmost importantly the love of God and family.  While Lou is now with her Lord and Savior and happily reunited with William, here she will be greatly missed.

A memorial service will be held Sunday, November 22, 2020, at 2:00 p.m. at Cayce United Methodist Church, 1600 12th Street, Cayce, SC 29033.  Due to COVID-19, CDC guidelines will be followed regarding face masks and social distancing.

The family requests that memorials be made to Cayce United Methodist Church Building Fund or to the charity of one's own choosing.  Please sign the online guest book at www.moseleyfuneralservice.com.

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Condolence Booklet

Karen Bates
   Posted Thu November 19, 2020
Lou and William were two of the finest people I've ever known. Lou was like a second mother to me for the past twenty years and I love her dearly. My prayers and condolences are with the family during this difficult time. May you all be comforted by the fact that she lived a long and exemplary life and is now reunited with William, Nancy, Jewel and a host of other friends and relatives. Over the years, I have become a part of the family. I love you, Lou, and I always will. May you rest in eternal peace.
We will ALL miss you dearly.

Elizabeth Bates
   Posted Thu November 19, 2020

DIGNITY IN WHITE PEDESTAL ARRANGEMENT was sent by Karen Bates.

My prayers are with the family. I love you all. May Lou rest in eternal peace. All my love, Karen Bates


Sid Major and family
   Posted Fri November 20, 2020
I'm sure that Aunt Lou is catching up with all the saints in heaven. We pray for the family as we celebrate her life.

Mike McCuillough
   Posted Fri November 20, 2020
Lula Mae was my aunt, I am the son of her sister Joyce. My mother died in January of 2017 and her other sister Jewell, died last November. They had another sister, Earleen, who died as a child. Lula Mae was the oldest of the six children Earl and Ivadell Spearman had, and she outlived them all. Her formative years coincided with the great depression and by the time she graduated high school, World War II was raging. Like the other girls Earl and Ivadell had, she was of above-average height and striking in appearance. The three of them must have been something to see in 1950, when Lula Mae would have been 24, Jewell 21 and my mother, Joyce 16 – already married with a child, my sister Brenda. I do not believe there are any pictures of them together around that time, but I would love to be proven wrong.

She married William, I assume in 1944, although it could have been 1945. She and William had Ruth, Nancy, Mary Lou and Bill and later adopted her brother’s son, Lee. I was away from them for most of my life, but the stories from early childhood were something that Lula Mae and could share when I would visit her, or we would talk on the phone. She had not called me in a while, so I was beginning to be worried, but I did not know she had gotten in such bad shape.

The last time I talked to her, she asked me how old I would be when she turned 100, which would have been 69. She said, ah, that’s nothing, you’ll still be young. We also loved to talk politics. She was amazed that so many good people could vote for people who were not themselves, good people. She would say, “I believe people have lost their minds, voting for people who have no sense and no moral decency.”

When William was still alive, just after the SC primary in 2008, I called she and William and they both got on the phone, wanting to let me know who they had voted for. He had voted for Obama and she had voted for Hillary, but they were just tickled to have such good candidates to vote for.

She was not shy about announcing her politics and she had a good history of standing by her beliefs. In the early 1960s, when the family arrived at their Methodist Church in Columbia for Sunday-morning services, she would walk down the street to the African American church and teach Sunday school, since her church would not allow African Americans to attend. No story from my family makes me more proud than this one.

I knew this time was coming, it comes to us all, but it is still difficult to think I will not have her to talk to, ever again. She is the last one of that generation, the last one who could tell stories of when I was a boy. She watched me grow up and was proud of me. I paid attention as she went to nursing school and then worked as a nurse for the most vulnerable population, psychiatric patients. She and William were powerful influences in my life. I owe them so much for their inspiration.

Happy transition, Aunt Lula Mae! Although I will not be able to attend the service on Sunday, I will be there in spirit.

Paul McCullough
   Posted Fri November 20, 2020

DIGNITY IN WHITE PEDESTAL ARRANGEMENT was sent by Mike McCullough.

From the children of her sister Joyce McCullough. Dear Aunt Lula Mae, you did amazing things to help the weakest among us, during your life! Your legacy makes us proud to be your nieces and nephews.


Mike McCullough
   Posted Fri November 20, 2020
Lula Mae was my aunt, I am the son of her sister Joyce. My mother died in January of 2017 and her other sister Jewell, died last November. They had another sister, Earleen, who died as a child. Lula Mae was the oldest of the six children Earl and Ivadell Spearman had, and she outlived them all. Her formative years coincided with the great depression and by the time she graduated high school, World War II was raging. Like the other girls Earl and Ivadell had, she was of above-average height and striking in appearance. The three of them must have been something to see in 1950, when Lula Mae would have been 24, Jewell 21 and my mother, Joyce 16 – already married with a child, my sister Brenda. I do not believe there are any pictures of them together around that time, but I would love to be proven wrong.

She married William, I assume in 1944, although it could have been 1945. She and William had Ruth, Nancy, Mary Lou and Bill and later adopted her brother’s son, Lee. I was away from them for most of my life, but the stories from early childhood were something that Lula Mae and could share when I would visit her, or we would talk on the phone. She had not called me in a while, so I was beginning to be worried, but I did not know she had gotten in such bad shape.

The last time I talked to her, she asked me how old I would be when she turned 100, which would have been 69. She said, ah, that’s nothing, you’ll still be young. We also loved to talk politics. She was amazed that so many good people could vote for people who were not themselves, good people. She would say, “I believe people have lost their minds, voting for people who have no sense and no moral decency.”

When William was still alive, just after the SC primary in 2008, I called she and William and they both got on the phone, wanting to let me know who they had voted for. He had voted for Obama and she had voted for Hillary, but they were just tickled to have such good candidates to vote for.

She was not shy about announcing her politics and she had a good history of standing by her beliefs. In the early 1960s, when the family arrived at their Methodist Church in Columbia for Sunday-morning services, she would walk down the street to the African American church and teach Sunday school, since her church would not allow African Americans to attend. That is the story from our family, of which I am the proudest.

I knew this time was coming, it comes to us all, but it is still difficult to think I will not have her to talk to, ever again. She is the last one of that generation, the last one who could tell stories of when I was a boy. She watched me grow up and was proud of me. I paid attention as she went to nursing school and then worked as a nurse for the most vulnerable population, psychiatric patients. She and William were powerful influences in my life. Thanks to both William and Lula Mae. I am forever in your debt for the lifelong inspiration you gave me.

Although I will not be able to attend the service on Sunday, I will be there in spirit.

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